Spring Vaccine & Deworming Protocol

Vaccinations

  • Eastern Western Encephalomyelitis/West Nile/Tetanus Toxoid to be given in spring to protect against mosquito born disease
  • Rhino/Flu booster should be given in the spring
  • Rabies vaccine should also be given if not given the previous fall
  • Fecal analysis should be performed to determine the appropriate deworming protocol

Worming

Protocol for Adult Horses (Greater Than 3 years old):
Low Shedders (0-199 Eggs Per Gram of Feces)

  • May 1: Ivermectin
  • November 1: Ivermectin + Praziquantel (Equimax, Zimectrin Gold)

Medium Shedders (200-500 Eggs Per Gram of Feces)

  • May 1: Ivermectin
  • August 1: Pyrantel (Strongid)
  • November 1: Ivermectin + Praziquantel (Equimax, Zimectrin Gold)

High Shedders (>500 Eggs Per Gram of Feces)

  • March 1: Ivermectin
  • May 1: Pyrantel (Strongid)
  • August 1: Ivermectin
  • November 1: Ivermectin + Praziquantel (Equimax, Zimectrin Gold)

*Recommend feeding your horse after deworming.

Protocol for Foals, Weanlings, and Horses Less Than 3 years old:

  • Day 0 – Mare should be dewormed at foaling with Ivermectin
  • 3 months – Panacur double dose
  • 6 months – Ivermectin
  • 9 months – Pyrantel double dose (for tapeworms)
  • 12 months – Ivermectin
  • After 12 months, deworm as you would a Medium Shedder:
    • May 1: Ivermectin
    • August 1: Pyrantel or Benzimidazole
    • November 1: Ivermectin + Praziquantel

At the age of 3, deworm based on Fecal Egg Count (FEC). Do a fecal test at least 12 weeks after last deworming to determine the protocol.

What is Horse Colic?

Dr. Mark Finke, DVM

Dr. Mark Finke, DVM

“What Is Horse Colic?” – Read this Western Horseman article with Colorado Equine Veterinary Services Dr. Mark Finke, DVM about horse colic. written by Kate Bradley.

“Colic is complicated, though the symptoms present the same—a horse in pain or distress that is kicking or biting its flanks or belly, pawing, and is up and down or rolling,” he says. “If you want to give your horse the best chance to come through colic, get your veterinarian on the phone.”

Before a horse shows signs of colic, horse owners should be aware of the potential causes and know how to prevent problems. Finke says common sense paired with knowledge of your horse’s daily routine is most important to keeping a horse healthy.

Read more: http://www.westernhorseman.com/index.php/horsemanship/article/694-what-is-horse-colic.html#ixzz2m35j9D5J